STUDIO EM04

ANNETTE ERLENWEIN

CHERNOBYL+

Design Studio 2004/5

Institut für experimentelle Architektur.Innsbruck University

Tutelage Prof Kjetil Thorsen, Annette Erlenwein, Andrea Kaltschmid, Frank Ludin

 

 

CHERNOBYL-1

 

Hubert Schlögl CHERNOBYL ITEMS ONLINE SHOP

 

CHERNOBYL-2

 

Daniel Brecher CHERNOBYL MEETS ZWENTENDORF

 

CHERNOBYL-3

 

Markus Ortner SILENCE AND EMPTINESS

CHERNOBYL-4

Nicolas Ebner MYTH FORM

 

 

On April 26th, 1986 Reactor four of the nuclear plant of Chernobyl, in the Ukraine, exploded.

Since then there has been a restricted area of 30km around the exploded Reactor. The 48 000 inhabitants of the city of Pripyat, which is seven kilometres away from the site - mostly workers of the power plant and their families - were evacuated and could not return to their homes ever since. Pripyat is now a ghost town.

The damaged radioactive reactor was enveloped by a concrete sarcophagus, after several weeks of fire fight. Since then it has been repeatedly repaired and finally renewed. The other reactors on the plant were reactivated, in the year 2000 the nuclear plant of Chernobyl was finally shut down. As a result of the damage 125000 to 146000 km² of land has been radioactively contaminated. Two weeks after the catastrophe winds spread radioactivity throughout Europe. The pollution is long-term, due to the half-life period of the radioactive substances, Iodium 131, Caesium 137, Strontium 90 Americanum being 8 days, 29, 30 and 433 years, respectively.

In the meantime around 800 citizens of Pripyat - mostly elderly persons - returned to the military restricted area and have been living there illegally since then. About 800 000 people were involved in the fire-fighting and clean-up of the catastrophe. Meanwhile 50 000 of them have died and most of the survivors have become seriously ill. Diseases caused by radioactivity have increased drastically in the Ukraine and the surrounding territories.

Goal of the project is to develop new architectural strategies and tools through the analysis of the unique situation of Chernobyl. To develop made-to-measure strategies and general tools applicable to other situations.

Based on fundamental research on ecological, political and social consequences of the Chernobyl reactor catastrophe - both worldwide and in the affected areas - urban development scenarios and/or single architectural installations should attempt to provide living conditions to the people on-site. Furthermore they should provide the necessary infrastructure to scientific research and incentives for commercial investment and industrial settlements.